Best For You


Borderline personality disorder

What is it

There are a few other names for borderline personality disorder. You might see or hear people talking about ‘BPD’, ‘emotionally unstable personality disorder’, or ‘EUPD’.

No two people’s personalities are the same – their personalities are what make them who they are. Young people’s personalities are still developing, so if they start to experience features linked to a personality disorder, they might be diagnosed with an ‘emerging’ or ‘borderline’ personality disorder.
Having a personality disorder doesn’t mean that there’s something bad about a person or who they are. It means that the way they see themselves and relate to others has been affected by their negative experiences and that they have difficulties with their emotions. For people with a personality disorder, these things affect their day-to-day lives. People with borderline personality disorder find that their emotions change a lot (often because of their relationships with people) and feel very intense.

Feelings and behaviours

  • Feeling alone and abandoned
  • Having emotions that change very quickly and in an extreme way
  • Having doubt about who you are
  • Feeling empty
  • Wondering if anybody really cares about you
  • Difficulty making or keeping close relationships
  • In some cases, thinking about self-harm or hurting yourself
  • Feeling angry a lot or struggling to contain your answer
  • Having unusual experiences such as hearing voices

Physical signs

  • Taking increased risks with: drugs, relationships, education, money, your things, or your body.
  • Feeling impulsive (likely to do things without thinking them through first) and doing impulsive things such as spending lots of money or taking risks.

What’s going on

Interviews, art, blogs, and tips about mental health and wellbeing.

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Calm harm app

Information about Calm Harm, an app from the Best For You app library that supports people to engage in activities and ‘ride the wave’ of the urge to self-harm.
Myths about self-harm for anyone who works with young people

Myths about self-harm for anyone who works with young people

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Myths about self-harm for parents and carers

Myths about self-harm for parents and carers

It can be distressing for parents and carers when a young person self-harms. Dr Ritu Mitra, Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, explains the truth behind common myths and offers helpful advice.
Myths about self-harm

Myths about self-harm

Dr Ritu Mitra, Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist, explains the truth behind common myths about self-harm and what young people can do if they (or someone they know) has hurt themselves on purpose.

Find support for young people

Flipbox - Mental health services

Get mental health support for young people

Information about mental health services (including CAMHS) if you’re a young person in Brent, Ealing, Hammersmith and Fulham, Harrow, Hillingdon, Hounslow, Kensington and Chelsea, or Westminster.

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Flipbox - Digital Mental Health

Digital mental health support for young people across the UK

Information about apps, websites, and other digital tools that exist to support you with your mental health and wellbeing.

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