Best For You


Mental health support for young people in Hillingdon

Lots of different services and organisations in Hillingdon offer support for young people. This page contains information about all of the different ways to get support.

 

If you need urgent help, for example because you’re in crisis:

Two young people, one wearing a beanie and one with shoulder-length hair. Text reads ‘It’s OK to say that you’re not OK’. One of the people has a skateboard, the other has lines around their head with the words ‘anxious’ and ‘sad’.

 

How to use this page

 

This page has a lot of information about different ways to access mental health support. It is split into different sections:

 

Accessing NHS mental health support 

For information about NHS mental health services in Hillingdon.

 

Other mental health support

For information about non-NHS organisations who offer free mental health support for young people in Hillingdon.

 

Support for specific things

For organisations that are experts at supporting young people in specific things, for example, supporting young people who have experienced bereavements or who are LGBTQ+ or seeking asylum.

 

Youth groups and other activities

Because we know that spending time with other people doing things you enjoy is good for your mental health.

 

Accessing NHS mental health support

 

You can make an appointment with your GP to talk about mental health. GP stands for ‘general practitioner’ – they’re doctors who have done extra training to be able to treat common medical conditions and refer people to other services for more specialist treatment or support. You can find out more about GPs (and how to register with one) on the NHS website.

Your GP can refer you to Hillingdon CAMHS (Child and Adolescent Mental Health Services).

As well as the Core CAMHS Team, you might be able to see people from:

Harrow and Hillingdon Early Intervention Service

This service is for people between the ages of 14 to 35 who are experiencing their first episode of psychosis. Young people can refer themselves to this service, or their GP can refer them.

Find out more about Harrow and Hillingdon Early Intervention Service on the CNWL website.

Central and North West London Community Eating Disorder Service for Children and Young People

This service supports children and young people aged 17 or under with eating disorders or suspected eating disorders (if a young person or an adult in their life thinks they may have an eating disorder).

Young people can refer themselves to this service or their GP, school, or college can refer them.

You can find out more about CNWL Community Eating Disorder Service for Children and Young People on the CNWL website.

 

Other mental health support

 

Counselling at The Mix (UK wide service)

The Mix offers up to eight sessions of free phone or online counselling to young people living in the UK who are aged 25 and under. You can get in touch yourself using a form on their website. Find out more about counselling at The Mix on their website.

Mentoring at the Julian Campbell Foundation

The Julian Campbell Foundation offers a mentoring programme for young people aged between 11 and 25 who are struggling to manage their mood or need some extra support to deal with emotional or stressful situations. You don’t need a diagnosis to be part of the mentoring programme. You can get in touch yourself by emailing them.

Find out more about the Julian Campbell Foundation on their website.

Creative arts through Arts for Life Project

Arts For Life Project is based on the Harrow and Hillingdon border, but accepts referrals from throughout London and surrounding areas.

Arts for Life Project offer one-to-one, person-centred therapeutic support for young people aged between 6 and 25. Anyone aged 16 and above can refer a young person through an online form.

Creative Crew is a weekly project for young people aged 6 and above who love the arts and are able to engage in a group setting. It allows young people to engage with the therapeutic power of the arts within a group. Through fun, relaxed activities, young people develop emotional intelligence and strengthen mental health. Anyone aged 16 and above can refer a young person through an online form.

Skills For Life is a course-based programme that helps young people aged 6 to 25 develop essential life skills, including technical, physical, wellbeing, and communication skills. Young people are put into suitable groups for the programme. Anyone aged 16 and above can refer a young person through an online form.

Together Thrive uses three different types of support to help young people aged 8 and above with complex challenges (including mental health concerns) progress back into society. It includes support at home, clinical therapeutic support, and mentor support. Young people aged 14 and above can refer themselves through the online form; parents and professionals can also refer through the same form.

The project also has programmes for parents and carers.

Find out more about Arts For Life Project on their website.

Counselling through Link

Link counselling is a free service for young people aged 13 to 24 who live, work, or study in Hillingdon. Young people can refer themselves – they do not need to be receiving support from the council already.

Find out more or self-refer to Link counselling through a form on the Hillingdon borough website.

One-to-one support, counselling, peer support, mindfulness, and workshops through Mind in Hillingdon

Mind in Hillingdon is starting a new service for young people ages 16 to 25 living in the borough of Hillingdon who are experiencing mental health issues. They will provide a range of one-to-one and group support to help young people manage their wellbeing and access community services and social activities.

The Mind in Hillingdon website is currently under construction. For more information, email Mind@HillingdonMind.org.uk

 

Support for specific topics

 

ADHD and autism

Centre for ADHD & Autism Support (for young people diagnosed with ADHD or autism)

Young people aged between 11 (in high school) and 25 with a diagnosis of ADHD or autism can access individual support in person, or over email, phone, or webchat. Counselling is also available if the young person meets the referral criteria.

Girls Group is for young women aged between 11 (in high school) and 16 with a diagnosis of ADHD or autism can access this group, which has discussion groups and creative activities to help girls understand their diagnosis and learn strategies to help them manage. 

WhyTry is a 10-week CBT-based course that supports young people in areas such as peer pressure, self-esteem, and understanding decisions and consequences. CALMS is a 6-week programme that helps young people explore their differences and learn to see the positives in an autism or ADHD diagnosis.

There is also a Creative Club, Young Persons Film Club, and Lego Therapy, as well as support for siblings and parents.

You can find out more and contact the Centre for ADHD & Autism Support about services through their website.

Bereavement

Grief Encounter (bereavement)

Grief Encounter offer up to 30 one to one weekly counselling sessions. The sessions can be at school, online, or at their centre in North London (NW7). They do not accept referrals for grandparent-related bereavement(s) unless the grandparent who died was a primary caregiver. You can get in touch about counselling yourself through an online form.

They also offer workshops, a residential retreat, fun days, and a choir. You can contact them about these by email.

Grief Encounter have a confidential phone helpline and online chat that is open from 9am to 9pm on weekdays.

Find out more about Grief Encounter on their website.

Winston’s Wish (bereavement – UK wide service)

Winston’s Wish offer one-off or ongoing advice, guidance, and bereavement support for young people up to the age of 25 (and their families). They have a helpline, which is open between 9am and 5pm on weekdays.

They also have online peer support groups (for young people aged between 7 and 12, for young people aged between 13 and 17, and for young people aged between 18 and 25, as well as for parents and carers), which are overseen by Bereavement Support Practitioners. They’re informal; young people can just go to one or keep going every month. You can get in touch and book a space on these yourself through the Winston’s Wish website.

Winston’s Wish also run drop-in sessions that give families and professionals the chance to to find out more about their services. These were suspended due to COVID but are beginning to restart. You can find details on the Winston’s Wish website.

Bereavement Care (for people who have experienced bereavement)

Bereavement care offer a range of serviced for children, young people, and adults. They have a free visiting scheme where people can talk in confidence with a trained volunteer, support programme for children and young people, and friendly support groups.

Find out more about Bereavement Care on their website.

Bullying

Zap through Kidscape (for young people aged 9 to 16 who have experienced bullying)
ZAP is a free workshop for children and young people aged between 9 and 16 who have been affected by bullying. ZAP aims to boost confidence and self-esteem and give young people assertiveness skills.  
 
The workshops are currently taking place online. A young person’s parent or carer needs to attend with them; there is a separate workshop for parents and carers. 
 

Criminal exploitation and county lines

St Giles Trust (for young people who are criminally exploited; have families in need of support with poverty, housing, gang involvement, or substance misuse; or have a parent in prison – UK wide service)

St Giles Trust offer community-based support for young people who are involved in gangs, serious violence, and offending. They also have services for children who have a parent in prison, for families affected by gangs, and for families experiencing poverty.

You can get in touch yourself by filling out a form on the St Giles Trust website.

Rescue and Response (for young people involved in or affected by county line activity)

Rescue and Response is delivered in partnership between four organisations and is funded across London by the Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime.

It involves one to one support, specialist support for young women, and family and housing support. The service includes a structured programme around topics like healthy relationships, violence against women and girls, identity and equality, trama, and safety planning. Professionals can refer through an online form.

Find out more about Rescue and Response on the Abianda website.

Young Women’s Service at Womens and Girls Network (for young women* who have experienced or are at risk of gendered violence)

This service is for young women aged between 11 and 18 (up to 21 for care leavers) who have experienced (or are at risk of) any form of gendered violence, including domestic violence, sexual violence, child sexual exploitation, gang associated violence, forced marriage, and so on.

The service welcomes trans and intersex young women. It also welcomes non-binary young people who feel the service would best meet their needs and experiences.

They offer advocacy, group work, and counselling.

Find out more about Women and Girls Network.

Only Connect (for people who have been released from prison)

Only Connect offer keyword support to people who are released from prison to help make the transition of leaving prison as smooth as possible. They support people with things like employment, housing, and opportunities to help them remain crime-free.

Find out more about Only Connect.

London Gang Exit (for young people who are affected, associated, or affiliated with gang related issues or serious youth violence)

This service is designed to complement existing local services and fill gaps in provision. It provides traditional one-to-one, confidential support to young people aged between 16 and 24 who are associated with or involved in gangs and are at significant risk of harm from gang activity, or pose risk to themselves or others. They consider referrals outside the age range on a case-by-case basis. 

LGE empowers young people to move away from gang lifestyles. Young people must be motivated to end their gang involvement and willing to work with the service. 

Young people can refer themselves. Family members, carers, friends, and other organisations can also refer young people. 

Find out more about London Gang Exit.

Education and employment

Education and employment support from Hillingdon borough

For young people aged between 16 and 19 (up to 25 years old if they have a special educational need) and aren’t currently in education, are new to the borough, or are unemployed or at risk of being unemployed, Hillingdon can support you.

They offer information on local services and open days and webinars, and they can also put you in touch with people who offer specialist support services.

Find out more about education and employment opportunities on the Hillingdon website.

Gambling

GamCare Young People’s Service (gambling – UK wide service)

GamCare’s Young People’s Service can support anyone in the UK aged 18 and under. They can support people who are experiencing harm (or at risk of experiencing harm) because of gambling – this includes young people who are gambling themselves and young people who are affected by someone else’s gambling.

They provide information, advice, and guidance; self-help tools; and interventions. You can get in touch yourself by phone, email, or the form on their website.

Find out more on the GamCare website.

LGBTQ+

Mosaic LGBT+ young persons’ trust (for people who are LGBTQ+)

Mosaic run a weekly youth club for LGBTQ+ people aged 18 and under. Part of this is a Culture Club, with discounted or free trips that give young people the chance to explore their identity or learn about LGBT+ culture. They also offer retreats.

Young people can talk to mentors: older LGBT+ people with similar lived experiences. Mentoring helps you to better manage practical issues (like relationships, family, or school). You do not have to be part of Youth Club to speak to a mentor, and you do not need permission from a parent or carer.

Mosaic also offer online counselling with counsellors who identify as LGBT+. Counselling helps you understand your emotions and experiences, and teaches you about tools and strategies that can help you manage.

You can get in touch yourself through a form on their website, or you can contact them by email or phone. Mosaic make sure that financial difficulties never block access to their services.

Find out more on their website.

The Proud Trust (for people who are LGBTQ+ – UK wide service)

The Proud Trust is based in Manchester but has an online web chat. You can also use their website to find your nearest LGBT+ Youth Group.

Find out more on the Proud Trust website.

LGBTQIA+ drop in (for LGBTQ+ young people already receiving targeted support from the council)

Hillingdon offers monthly drop ins for 11 to 13 year olds and 14 to 17 year olds who are LGBTQIA+ or are questioning their identity. 

Professionals can refer young people who live, work, or study in Hillingdon and already receive targeted support from the council (through social care, youth justice, or other interventions).

Find out more and refer young people on the Hillingdon website.

Migrants, refugees, and asylum seekers

Freedom From Torture (for survivors of torture – UK wide service)

Freedom From Torture offers trauma-focused therapy to help with the effects of trauma, including complex trauma, depression, and other mental health needs. They also offer further services, including creative group activities, social groups, and physical therapy to help survivors rebuild their lives. They offer practical advice for survivors who are seeking asylum.

You can get in touch yourself by filling out a form on the Freedom from Torture website.

Hillingdon Refugee Support Group (HSRG)

HSRG work with unaccompanied asylum seekers and refugees aged between 16 and 21. They work with unaccompanied young people up to the age of 25 if they continue to be supported by social services as care leavers.

HSRG offers a range of services and structured workshops including English and maths lessons, life skill and befriending, one-to-one drop ins for practical and emotional support, and group activities with local non-refugee young people.

Find out more on the Hillingdon Refugee Support Group website.

Sexual health

North West London Sexual Health and Contraception Services

This NHS service provides testing for STIs, post-exposure prophylaxis against HIV (PEP), pre-exposure prophylaxis against HIV (PrEP), pregnancy testing, contraception, emergency contraception, and HIV care.

Find out more about sexual health and contraception services (including Oaklands Medical Centre in Uxbridge and Wakely Centre in Hayes) on their website.

KISS (Keep it Safe ‘n’ Sorted)

KISS is a safe setting for 13 to 19 year olds to talk about relationships, peer pressure, safe sex, and STIs. They offer free condoms, c-cards (cards that give you access to free safe sex supplies), and pregnancy tasting.

You can find out about KISS (and other services that offer things like contraception, cervical screening, and STI testing and treatment) on the Hillingdon borough website.

Substance misuse

St Giles Trust (for young people who are criminally exploited; have families in need of support with poverty, housing, gang involvement, or substance misuse; or have a parent in prison – UK wide service)

St Giles Trust offer community-based support for young people who are involved in gangs, serious violence, and offending. They also have services for children who have a parent in prison, for families affected by gangs, and for families experiencing poverty.

You can get in touch yourself by filling out a form on the St Giles Trust website.

Arch (Addiction Recovery Community Hillingdon)

Arch offers a range of treatments for young people and adults who live in (or are registered with a GP in) Hillingdon. They work with people at any stage of their problem with drugs or alcohol.

Their service includes personal recovery plans, needle exchange, psychosocial interventions, medicine to manage withdrawal, one-to-one and group therapies, peer support, group activities, social networks, and joint working with employment and housing oranisations.

They also support family members, friends, and carers of people who use alcohol or drugs – even if the person using alcohol or drugs is not willing to engage with services.

Find out more about Arch on their website.

Violence and abuse

Young Women’s Service at Womens and Girls Network (for young women* who have experienced or are at risk of gendered violence)

This service is for young women aged between 11 and 18 (up to 21 for care leavers) who have experienced (or are at risk of) any form of gendered violence, including domestic violence, sexual violence, child sexual exploitation, gang associated violence, forced marriage, and so on.

The service welcomes trans and intersex young women. It also welcomes non-binary young people who feel the service would best meet their needs and experiences.

They offer advocacy, group work, and counselling.

Find out more about Women and Girls Network.

CouRAGEus Project (for Black and Minoritised young women* who have experienced (or are at risk of) any form of gendered violence)

This project offers specialist advocacy support and counselling for Black and Minoritised young women* who have experienced (or are at risk of) any form of gendered violence, including domestic violence, sexual violence, child sexual exploitation, gang associated violence, forced marriage, and so on.

* This is defined as including BME, LGBT+ and Disabled young women. They welcome trans and intersex young women. They also welcome non-binary young people who feel the service would best meet their needs and experiences.

Find out more about CouRAGEus.

Solace Children’s Creative Therapies (for young people affected by domestic or sexual violence)

This service offers therapy for young people aged 4 and above. Therapists work with young people with art making, play, drama, and talking as appropriate to help the young person better understand their feelings and improve their self-esteem.

Young people must be living in a safe and stable enough environment – the perpetrator can no longer be living with the family (or in a relationship with the mother or carer) and any contact must be deemed to be safe. 

There is a waiting list for referrals. 

Find out more about Solace Children’s Creative Therapies.

DVIP YUVA (for young people using violence or abuse)

This service offers confidential, one-to-one support for young people aged between 11 and 18 (up to 25 years old for people with additional needs) who use violence or abuse and want to change their behaviour and improve their awareness of healthy communication and relationships.

Parents, carers, and professionals can refer a young person. The organisation prefers referrals from professionals if possible.

Find out more about DVIP YUVA.

Being me (for children who have witnessed domestic abuse and are already receiving targeted support from the council)

Being Me is a programme that supports children aged between 8 and 17 who have witnessed domestic abuse to explore self-esteem, healthy relationships, and personal safety.

Professionals can refer young people who live, work, or study in Hillingdon and already receive targeted support from the council (through social care, youth justice, or other interventions).

Find out more and refer young people on the Hillingdon website.

DVIP Child Therapy Service (for young people affected by domestic violence)

This service offers therapy to lessen the effect of domestic violence on young people aged between 3 and 17. The therapists are child psychotherapists or play and creative arts therapists with specific training in domestic abuse issues in clinical practice. Therapy is tailored depending on the young person’s age.

The young person must currently be living in a safe and stable environment, and the perpetrator of abuse must not be residing with them.

Young people can refer themselves, or a parent or carer or professional can refer them.

Find out more about DVIP Child Therapy Service on their website.

Young carers

Carers Trust Hillingdon

Carers Trust Hillingdon supports young carers aged between 5 and 24. They provide emotional support, school liaison, information and advice, and social activities for young carers.

Find out more on the Carers Trust Hillingdon website.

Honeypot (for young carers aged 5 to 12 – UK wide service)

Honeypot offer a range of services to support young carers aged between 5 and 12, including respite breaks for children, social and emotional active learning breaks, online workshops, face-to-face workshops, and financial support through a wellbeing fund. 

Find out more on the Honeypot website.

Other

St Giles Trust (for young people who are criminally exploited; have families in need of support with poverty, housing, gang involvement, or substance misuse; or have a parent in prison – UK wide service)

St Giles Trust offer community-based support for young people who are involved in gangs, serious violence, and offending. They also have services for children who have a parent in prison, for families affected by gangs, and for families experiencing poverty.

You can get in touch yourself by filling out a form on the St Giles Trust website.

Freedom From Torture (for survivors of torture – UK wide service)

Freedom From Torture offers trauma-focused therapy to help with the effects of trauma, including complex trauma, depression, and other mental health needs. They also offer further services, including creative group activities, social groups, and physical therapy to help survivors rebuild their lives. They offer practical advice for survivors who are seeking asylum.

You can get in touch yourself by filling out a form on the Freedom from Torture website.

Hillingdon Navigator Plus at P3 (for support and signposting for topics like housing, home life, relationships, education, and wellbeing)

You don’t need to wait until a problem is getting on top of you before talking to Hillingdon Navigator Plus. You can make an appointment by phone or email to access a range of help and support at their wellbeing hub. They can help you find the support that’s right for you.

They also run a range of activities and peer support groups.

Find out more about Hillingdon Navigator Plus or make an appointment on their website.

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Youth groups and other activities

 

School holiday activities for young people

Hillingdon offers fun, free sessions and workshops for young people who, live, study, or work in Hillingdon; who are between 8 and 19; and who may benefit from targeted support.

Young people and families can refer themselves. Professionals can also refer young people who are already receiving targeted support from the council (through social care, youth justice, or other interventions).

Typical activities in the school holidays include games, arts, crafts, cooking, and sports.

Find out more and refer young people on the Hillingdon website.

Year-round clubs and programmes from the borough of Hillingdon

Hillingdon offers group programmes for children and young people aged between 8 and 24 who live, work, or study in Hillingdon.

There are different groups for young people of different ages and genders. Programmes include those focusing on resilience-building, life skills, wellbeing, one-to-one mentoring, LGBTQIA+ young people, domestic abuse, and more.

Young people and families can refer themselves. Professionals can also refer young people who already receive targeted support from the council (through social care, youth justice, or other interventions).

Find out more and refer young people on the Hillingdon website.

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